Blue Crush Could Have Easily Been Exploitative with Other Male Directors, According to Kate Bosworth

Blue Crush Could Have Easily Been Exploitative with Other Male Directors, According to Kate Bosworth ...

Kate Bosworth did not allow Hollywood to crush her in the early 2000s ahead of her big breakthrough in Blue Crush.

The actress talked about her breakout role and what might have been a bikini-clad Girls Gone Wild recreation of a sports surfing film.

In 2001, Bosworth told Vulture that the roles for women were certainly not multidimensional. The ones that were exhibiting a lot of depth were quite competitive, and I was a no one at the time. It wasnt pleasant because that's the game, but the stereotypes were unpleasant.

She continued, "If you remember the early 2000s, they could be quite horrifying for young girls," thus I was a little depressed.

To be fair, until director John Stockwell and producer Brian Grazer sent her the entire script for Blue Crush.

I loved it so much. In hindsight, these experiences are lightning in a bottle, Bosworth said. Im so grateful that John and Brian imagined the movie that exists today, because in the wrong hands, it may have been quite exploitative.

I think that a film with girls running around wearing bikinis might be different from what it was in the early 2000s. John and Brian are both surfers, and they were just interested in exploiting that other possibility. They were just trying to tell a genuine, authentic surf story.

After the release of the film, which also featured Michelle Rodriguez and Sanoe Lake, Bosworth recalled being considered for every strong, athletic role out of the blue. 'I remember thinking, Oh, that's how it all works.' Bosworth explained. I wrote a book about it, which was very moving.

Director Stantockwell went on to direct Into the Blue and episodes of The L Word, while Oscar-winning producer Grazer continued his longtime collaboration with director Ron Howard, most recently behind Thirteen Lives and the series Under the Banner of Heaven.