The trailer for 'The Legacy of the Texas Chain Saw Massacre' examines Tobe Hooper's Slasher's impact

The trailer for 'The Legacy of the Texas Chain Saw Massacre' examines Tobe Hooper's Slasher's impact ...

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre is a well-known and unique entry into the genre from the early 1970s onward. While Halloween, Friday the 13th, and Nightmare on Elm Street focused on brutal murders, Tobe Hooper's classic possesses a rawness to the screen that adds to its realistic feel and terror, all while motivating the slashers to come.

The film, titled The Legacy of the Texas Chain Saw Massacre, invites experts from throughout the horror genre to discuss the elements that made it a classic. From the start, people weren't sure what to expect from the film; instead, it evoked a sense of danger and violence.

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, despite its lack of blood and violence, feels grittier and more violent than it is. Whether it's the more grounded, realistic murder methods used by Leatherface or the gleeful torture the Sawyer family uses, there's something that feels inherently wrong about the film: "You feel a sense that the people making this film may not be fine." It's that feeling Hooper brings to the film that ultimately results in a cult film.

The Legacy of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre attracted some serious horror men, including Bloody Disgustings head critic Meagan Navarro, Fangorias editor-in-chief Phil Nobile Jr., The Daily Deads Heather Wixson, and Jason Goes to Hell director Adam Marcus, among others.

The documentary The Found Footage Phenomenon, produced by Escott's Fractured Visions and Second Sight Films, will be unveiled at Fantastic Fest next month. He's been working on dozens of documentaries and short films over the years, though his next film, 3 Days on Planet Earth, is a sci-fi horror film.

Below is a teaser for The Legacy of the Texas Chain Saw Massacre.