The Composer of 'Euphoria' on the Relationship Between the Fans and the Score

The Composer of 'Euphoria' on the Relationship Between the Fans and the Score ...

Euphoria has taken over the world in many ways, from the clothes to the makeup, and fans have embraced the Zendaya-led series for its acting, storytelling, and more. The music, however, is brought to life by composer Labrinth (who Zendayaoften works with), and now, in a new interview with Variety, Labrinth and Emmy-nominated music supervisor Adam Leber talked about the show's power.

One of the things about Euphoria that is really fascinating is seeing how viewers interpret the music they hear in the program, such as Season 2's "I'm Tired" from Labrinth, which features Zendaya's vocals. It's not the first time that a song from the program has grown so popular.

It's Labrinth's gift and in the interview, it's clear that he recognizes that Euphoria fans love this music and live in it long after the season of the series has ended, and it's fascinating to hear him and Leber talk about the way the songs differed from Season 1 to Season 2.

"One of the things that we learned from Season One is that the show's approach to music, especially the original music, and even the score, has a significant impact on youth culture," said Labrinth. "Those songs, like Im Tired or Elliots Song, are genuine hits with not just incredible content creation around it, but also hundreds of millions of streams."

Labrinth went on to discuss how the program evolved into something completely different within the show's fandom.

"It became fun because there was such a fandom for that part of the show." I was quite vocal and asked people what they wanted to see. Thats what music is for. To see it translated on a scale on this scale, and also translated on all of these social media platforms. That was unheard of, at a certain time, in a certain era."

"It became a hobby because there was such a fandom for that part of the program. I felt we were composing the score with fans of the program."

Both are correct: the music has become its own thing outside of the show, and it is a testament to how Labrinth and Leber collaborate, and how the program has radically altered how many people today view television.

Variety