From 'Singin' in the Rain' to 'Zack and Miri Make a Porno,' here are some of the best movies about the magic of movies

From 'Singin' in the Rain' to 'Zack and Miri Make a Porno,' here are some of the best movies about t ...

Movies that focus on cinema's magic are common, but boy, can they go haywire quite fast. Done incorrectly, and these kinds of titles may end up being an example of a snake eating its tail, causing general viewers to lose interest in the medium of movies. But, done properly, these are motion pictures that can captivate while simultaneously reintroducing the viewer to the experience in the first place.

Over the years, a wide range of motion pictures has successfully explored this notion. Various decades, different industries, and so many other variations have given rise to unique interpretations of what makes movies special. The very best films about the magic of movies have a common thread: They are all love letters to a medium that, regardless of whether it's 1922 or 2022, people just can't seem to get enough of.

Singin' in the Rain

The beginning of sound in cinema has caused enormous disruption to the world of movies, which has a lasting impact on the characters of Singin in the Rain. But, Gene Kelly's greatest musical ever utilizes this technological advancement as the vehicle for a plot that focuses on the greatness of show business as well as the way art can bring people together, an attraction that only becomes stronger as the candidate for the role of talking artist.

Singin in the Rain's ability to create an unforgettable romance isnt the only way. Various sounds in this masterpiece can often enhance one's appreciation of different aspects of filmmaking, such as Cosmo's (Donald O'Connor) ode to comedy actors in the tune "Make 'Em Laugh," or a long ode to classic musicals in "Broadway Melody."

Ed Wood

Ed Wood was dubbed the "worst filmmaker ever" for directing films like Plan 9 from Outer Space or Glen or Glenda. There was no sense of continuity from one scene to the next, but there was nonetheless passion on the screen. Woods' clear affinity for his works and his embrace of unusual yet unexpectedly personal plotlines make his film the very definition of the Anton Ego line from Ratatouille, "the average piece of junk is probably more important than our criticism of it."

Tim Burtons film on the film, Ed Wood, is a complete guideline rather than merely a punching bag. Woods world is rendered under Burton's watchful eye with a monochromatic color scheme and production design that would emulate the visuals of an actual Ed Wood film. More importantly, there is a constant sense of empathy for this man's creative spirit.

Be Kind Rewind

Be Kind Rewind's accidental deletion of a VHS store's entire inventory of videos yields an inspired story. The duo will then recreate all of the films themselves in an extremely handcrafted manner in a process known as "sweding." In lesser hands, this concept could have resulted in hollow fan service and dumb callbacks. Thankfully, director Michel Gondry and an extremely talented cast are on hand to ensure that Be Kind Rewind lives up to its potential in terms of thoughtfulness.

When Mike and Jerry try to remake films like Ghostbusters or RoboCop on a modest budget, the film often becomes a testament to the effort and dedication invested in certain films. What makes something like 2001: A Space Odyssey so special? How does it relate to you?

The Purple Rose of Cairo

If executed poorly, The Purple Rose of Cairo might have been a nightmare for a cinema enthusiast. Cecilia (Mia Farrow) and archeologist John Baxter (Jeff Daniels) are two of the city's most famous actors.

Because of the warm chemistry between Farrow and Daniels, their relationship uncovers something more. The Purple Rose of Cairo, which is set against The Great Depression, is an ode to how necessary escapism can be. However, The Purple Rose of Cairo does demonstrate how often films can provide a welcome respite from the harsh reality.

Cinema Paradiso

Cinema Paradiso, a 1988 film directed by Giuseppe Tornatore, is a reasonably priced pick for films about the magic of movies. But just because it is a popular choice when it comes to a stunning kid watching a projected film for a YouTube montage, it does not mean it fails to demonstrate the power of movies. From the start, Salvatore Di Vita (Salvatore Cascio) to projectionist Alfredo (Philippe Noiret)

Cinema Paradiso underscores just how important the bonds formed by the cinema's fires are. Even when someone important passes away or a historic cinema theater is demolished, the memories one associates with those people and places will never fade.

Zack and Miri Make a Porno

Zack and Miri Make a Porno, directed by Kevin Smith, is as crude as its title implies. But it's also a loving nod to all the effort involved in creating even the most unorthodox of performances. The eventual romance between Zack and Miri is yet another of cinema's endless depictions of how filmmaking can open the way to wonderful romances.

The way Kevin Smith made his directorial debut, Clerks, is akin to that of Zack and Miri, who focus on all the impossible yet amazing things movies can achieve. Traditionally, such a concept hasnt been explored in feature-length stories with a project named Star Whores. However, when has Kevin Smith done things by the book?

Brigsby Bear

In trying to describe the plot of the 2017 Indie Film Brigsby Bear, you may feel like you've lost all your marbles. "Brigsby Bear," he says, was created by James Pope, the only children's show he was permitted to see. "Brigsby Bear," according to his "father."

Whether or not Pope realizes it, his quest to complete Brigsby Bear's rambling filmmaking methods is a way to bring him to terms with a psychological agony he cannot comprehend. Now, though, he gets to find solace in a fictional world that he does not understand. Plus, it can bring us close to the people around us, from a cop/aspiring actor to a fellow patient at a mental hospital.

Nothing better illustrates Brigsby Bears touching observation on cinema than when James Pope expresses his love for making a film! The unbridled joy in Mooneys line delivery, the clear sense of decisive preference after a life isolated from the outside world, all speaks to a sort of magic that only movies can create.