On streaming, a remake that transformed an all-time classic into a billion-dollar bore hits the snooze button

On streaming, a remake that transformed an all-time classic into a billion-dollar bore hits the snoo ...

The Disney Live-action remakes' production process has often been criticized, and for good reason. Far too many of them completely fail to justify their own existence, and it would be fair to name Bill Condon's Beauty and the Beast as one of the most prominent culprits.

The 1991 original was a game-changer in every sense of the word, resurrecting the Mouse House's stagnant animation division on its way to $440 million at the box office on a budget of $25 million, as well as becoming the first animated feature to win a Golden Globe for Best Picture in the Musical or Comedy category.

Condon's star-studded and admittably visually stunning $200 million makeover is that it packs out its runtime with a bunch of superfluous – and ultimately frustrating – additional subplots that are clearly for advertising purposes. Of course, considering that its predecessor came in at a rapid-fire 84 minutes, you can sense every second of the additional 45 that's been thrown into the blockbuster remake.

The timing for which Beauty and the Beast would net upwards of $1.2 billion at the box office is irrelevant, as it confirms once more that Disney enthusiasts would flock in droves based on name recognition alone. The film itself has been streaming this week, with FlixPatrol revealing that the star-crossed romance between Emma Watson and Dan Stevens' title characters has been a majorstay on the iTunes charts.